Stockholm Central

The station was opened in 1871. The present building was completed and officially opened in 1872. At the time, it was the largest building in Stockholm aside from the Royal Palace. Today, nearly 1000 trains stop here every day and 190,000 passengers per day use the station.


Stockholm Central, looking south

(24 February 2002)
Looking south, toward Gamla stan, from platform 13/14 at Stockholm Central. The tracks converge to just two between here and Stockholms södra.


Stockholm Central, looking east

(24 February 2002)
Looking east from platform 13/14 at Stockholm Central. There used to be a park where all those ugly roads are today.


Stockholm Central, looking west

(24 February 2002)
A westward look from the same vantage point. The impressive brick building is the Stockholm City Hall, completed in 1923, where the Nobel Prize dinner is held every 10 December.


Stockholm Central, view to the northwest

(24 February 2002)
Ugly? Did I mention these roads are ugly? This view is looking northwest from the same vantage point as the previous photos.


Stockholm Central, southbound commuter train

(24 February 2002)
A southbound commuter train (for Södertälje) at Stockholm Central.


Stockholm Central, coupling of a commuter train

(24 February 2002)
I took this photo to try to provide a good view of the couplers used on our commuter trains. The two people on the right are the train crew.


Stockholm Central, exit from platform

(24 February 2002)
One of the exits from platform 13/14 (the southbound commuter train platform). This exit leads to an underground passageway that connects to other tracks, to services on the lower level of the main station, and to the subway.


Stockholm Central, looking north

(24 February 2002)
Looking north from the north end of platform 13/14. The sign "ATC slutar" means that automatic train control ends at this point.


Stockholm Central, Övre hallen

(24 February 2002)
This ticket hall, called "Övre hallen" ("the upper hall"), is only for the commuter trains and the escalators and stairs lead only to and from platform 13/14 (southbound commuter trains) and 15/16 (northbound commuter trains).


Stockholm Central, Övre hallen, 2

(24 February 2002)
Övre hallen from a different vantage point.


Stockholm Central, main hall

(24 February 2002)
The main hall of Stockholm Central. There are a number of shops and services on this level, as well as ticket sales for the mainline railways.


Stockholm Central, main hall, 2

(24 February 2002)
A view of the main hall from floor level.


Stockholm Central, main hall, 3

(24 February 2002)
The main hall from a different vantage point. Ticket sales for SJ (formerly the Swedish State Railways, now a state-owned corporation) are to the left here.


Stockholm Central, arrivals and departures

(24 February 2002)
This board shows mainline train arrivals and departures.


Stockholm Central, outside entrance

(24 February 2002)
Just outside the main entrance, this stairway leads to the lower-level passageway that connects to both the through tracks (10-19) and the subway.


Stockholm Central, main entrance

(24 February 2002)
A view of the main entrance to Stockholm Central, with the statue of Nils Ericsson, the father of Swedish railroads.


Stockholm Central, distant view

(24 February 2002)
A view of the station building from across Vasagatan.


Stockholm Central, long view

(24 February 2002)
A lengthwise view of the station building, looking more or less northwest from Vasagatan.


Stockholm Central, end view

(24 February 2002)
A view from the road viaduct south of the station, looking north. Vasagatan is on the right.

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